Responsible fishing

There’s more than one way to catch fish, but we’ve high standards and expect no less from our fishing partners. That’s why we only work with people who are committed to fishing responsibly.

Our commitment

Princes aims to source Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fish and is actively involved in Fishery Improvement Projects (FIP’s) around the world.

With the aim of improving fisheries management and sourcing new MSC products.

For tuna, our goal is for all of it to be responsibly sourced by the end of 2019.

How will we achieve our Global Tuna Sustainability goals?

Science led

Science led approach

Fishery improvement

Fishery Improvement Projects and conservation projects

Working with our partners

Working with our partners 

Our progress so far

100% compliant & traceable

100% compliant & traceable

We meet all of our industry regulations and don’t allow any illegal fishing practices or methods.

Founders of the ISSF

Founders of the ISSF

As a proud founding partner of the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF), we work closely with some of the world’s top scientists to help improve standards in tuna fishing.

Proactive Vessel Register

Proactive Vessel Register

When we purchase tuna from large scale purse seine vessels we make sure they’re registered on the Proactive Vessel Register (PVR). The PVR is crucial to ensuring our traceability back to individual boats that implement science based responsible fishing practices. To get on the register, each ship’s captain must be trained in best fishing practices including how to minimise bycatch.

Fishery improvement

Fishery improvement

We only ever work with partners who are as committed as we are to catching fish responsibly. So we’re working together to help preserve the world’s oceans, sealife and improve fishing standards.

MSC

MSC

We’re big investors in research that helps fisheries towards MSC certification, and we work with current MSC certified fisheries that are committed to sustainable fishing practices.

Dolphin friendly

Dolphin friendly

All Princes tuna is dolphin friendly, and as a long standing member of the Earth Island Institute (EII), we only work with tuna fisheries that reduce the risk of dolphins being unintentionally caught in the tuna fishing process.

 

How do we catch our fish

Tuna

Our dolphin friendly tuna is caught using pole and line or purse seine net fishing, so the chances of other types of fish being caught up in the nets is very low.

Pole-and-line

A simple fishing pole and a baited hook is used by our fishermen to catch tuna one-by-one. This highly-selective technique minimises the chance of other types of fish being caught.

Purse seine nets

Purse seine nets sit upright in the water with their bottom edge held down by weights and their top edge supported by floats. Fishing boats tow the net to surround schools of fish. Catching fish this way cuts the chances of catching other, unwanted types of fish unintentionally.

Salmon

Our fresh packed salmon is wild caught in the Pacific Oceans using purse seine nets and gillnets. The size of the holes in the gillnets means they only target salmon, while other sea life can swim free.

Gillnets

Gillnets work by catching fish which try to swim through the mesh nets. The size of the mesh is designed specifically for the Salmon meaning that the bycatch of other fish is very low.

Purse seine nets

Purse seine nets sit upright in the water with their bottom edge held down by weights and their top edge supported by floats. Fishing boats tow the net to surround schools of fish. Catching fish this way cuts the chances of catching other, unwanted types of fish unintentionally.

Mackerel, Sardines & Kippers

Our mackerel, sardines and kippers are caught using trawl nets and purse seine nets, which don’t touch the sea floor. This helps protect the oceans and minimises the chance of catching other sea life unintentionally.

Trawl nets

These cone-shaped nets are dragged through the mid-water behind a trawler. Because they never touch the bottom of the sea, there is no danger of them damaging the sea bed and destroying marine habitat. Bycatch levels are also typically much lower than other fishing methods.

Purse seine nets

Purse seine nets sit upright in the water with their bottom edge held down by weights and their top edge supported by floats. Fishing boats tow the net to surround schools of fish. Catching fish this way cuts the chances of catching other, unwanted types of fish unintentionally.